Are you in the dark (like most marketers) about your omnichannel performance?

Marketing mix attribution is often one of the biggest problems a marketer can face; how to fathom out in an omnichannel environment how much each of those channels you are using is really contributing?

And how much for instance are they contributing to new customer recruitment v. existing customer sales?

Google has a solution for attributing what goes on in the digital space, but this leaves out important areas like emails opened, catalogues received, SMS messages, outbound calling, even retail visits.

So, we set about developing ADEE, or Algorithmic Direct Event Attribution.

For us it’s the culmination of a journey which we began by solving the problem of attributing orders to events, where clients were using both online and offline channels.

Curiously, nobody else appeared to be doing this.

We needed to create a result that made sense of the relative contributions of all the online and offline events that took place before each order is placed. (By the way the average is around five per order).

We needed to apply a fair weighting to these events that described the influence they had on each eventual order.

Then we had to add up all the events to the channels in which they took place to understand the value contributed by each channel.

Finally, we needed to let our clients decide whether they wanted to look at all customer orders, or for instance just new customers, or customers buying a particular product category.

I am delighted to say that we ended up creating ADEE!

If you would like me to send you our white paper on ADEE then please email us on info@unifida.co.uk.

It could transform your understanding of the true contribution that each of your online and offline channels are making.


UniFida logo

UniFida is the trading name of Marketing Planning Services Ltd, a London based technology and data science company set up in 2014. Our overall aim is to help organisations build more customer value at less marketing cost.

Our technology focus has been to develop UniFida. Our data science business comes both from existing users of UniFida, and from clients looking to us to solve their more complex data related marketing questions.

Marketing is changing at an explosive speed, and our ambition is to help our clients stay empowered and ahead in this challenging environment.


We are told that first party data is taking centre stage!

This is according to a just published report from the Winterberry Group ‘The State of Data’; to be fair it does only cover US marketeers but trends there are often repeated in the UK.

The reasons behind this are not too hard to guess:

– the phasing out of the use of 3rd party cookies
– the better returns to be got from looking after existing customers compared to recruiting new ones

Respondents highlighted use cases associated with leveraging and deriving value from first party data as those that will capture their foremost attention in 2020.

Without wanting to blow our own trumpet too loudly, the combination of UniFida customer data platform technology and data science covers all the areas inside the red box.

Please try our short survey to find out if you should be considering introducing a customer data platform, and please email us on info@unifida.co.uk if you would like to arrange a Zoom chat with our founder Julian Berry to check whether we may be able to help you put first party data centre stage.


UniFida logo

UniFida is the trading name of Marketing Planning Services Ltd, a London based technology and data science company set up in 2014. Our overall aim is to help organisations build more customer value at less marketing cost.

Our technology focus has been to develop UniFida. Our data science business comes both from existing users of UniFida, and from clients looking to us to solve their more complex data related marketing questions.

Marketing is changing at an explosive speed, and our ambition is to help our clients stay empowered and ahead in this challenging environment.


Where do you go to get answers to your most pressing marketing questions?

We are thinking of questions like:

– where are my most valuable customers coming from?
– what’s the best next offer I can make to each of them?
– how can I identify those dormant customers that are most likely to be reactivated?
– how much should I budget to spend in each of my online and offline channels?

In days of old you would most probably have fired questions like these at your advertising agency, and they would have responded using a smattering of science combined with a lot of judgement.

In today’s evidence-based world there are few one-stop solutions that can properly answer questions like these because to do so requires the right combination of marketing savvy, data, and data science.

However, there is something without which none of these questions can be answered, and that is the single customer view, where all data about your interactions with your customers are held.

For example, just taking the four questions we started with, you will at least need to know:

– how each customer was recruited?
– what their propensities are to buy from each of your main product categories?
– what sorts of customers are self-reactivating?
– all the online and offline events that preceded each of your customer orders?

So, what can we conclude so far?

That your single customer view needs to be skilfully designed to hold both the ‘raw’ facts such as details of a transaction, or a website visit, and also the ‘derived’ facts like a propensity to behave in a certain way.

But the single customer view is only part of the solution.

Our view is that the go-to resource you need is a combination of a customer data platform (the tool that builds the single customer view), with marketers to specify what it is expected to do, and data scientists to transform its raw data into sophisticated engineered predictions concerning your customers’ behaviour.

This is also the basis on which we have built our company. An understanding that marketeers need that right combination of people, technology, and data science to support their marketing actions and decisions.

If this is what you are looking for, then please email is at info@unifida.co.uk and we will arrange a Zoom with our founder Julian Berry who will be delighted to discuss how we can help.


UniFida logo

UniFida is the trading name of Marketing Planning Services Ltd, a London based technology and data science company set up in 2014. Our overall aim is to help organisations build more customer value at less marketing cost.

Our technology focus has been to develop UniFida. Our data science business comes both from existing users of UniFida, and from clients looking to us to solve their more complex data related marketing questions.

Marketing is changing at an explosive speed, and our ambition is to help our clients stay empowered and ahead in this challenging environment.


Exactly how much do your online and offline channels contribute to your sales?

Do you really know exactly how much each of your online and offline channels are contributing to your sales?

The blunt truth is that the great majority of marketers don’t!

Google for instance claims that businesses make an average of $2 for every $1 spent on Google Ads, but this is just a blatant case of Google marking its own homework. Are they saying that $1 Google Ads caused the $2 worth of sales, or just that there is some form of observed correlation? And how do they account for the impact of all the other forms of advertising from TV to outdoor to press to email?

Given the billions that hang on decisions about how to allocate marketing budgets across different online and offline channels, we felt that it was essential to work on giving our clients the tools and the knowledge to properly support these important decisions.

We started with some key assumptions:

– That decisions to purchase are necessarily complex and driven by multiple factors. Many of these factors like brand awareness cannot be recorded in the context of an individual sale, but many can be, and for those that are, we should look at all the known recordable events before a sale, and certainly not just online events, or worse still, just last clicks.

– What we call recordable events are activities like receipt of a catalogue, opening an email, visiting a website from a social media advert, or using Google Ads to find a website. Some of these events are driven by the customer like natural search, and some are driven by the vendor like receiving a catalogue.

– That we would assemble all the recordable online and offline events before each sale and use these as the dataset from which to analyse the true impact of different channels and different time intervals between an order and an event.

– That having overcome the challenge of collecting all the online and offline events together, we would focus our analysis on the central question of how to weigh the different types of events. Intuition tells us that an event 60 days before an order may have played a smaller role in the decision to purchase than one on the same day as the order, but the question we needed to answer was by how much? Also, should we give different weightings to different types of event? Is an opened email more or less important than a website visit happening as a result of a click through from a Google Ad?

– We do not want to suggest that marketers should ignore unrecordable events such as TV viewing or driving past an outdoor lightbox. Rather that their effects need to be analysed using different techniques like time series analysis, and that in so far as credit is given to recordable events it should be shared with the credit due to unrecordable events.

We have used orders and recorded events from two very different retailers to provide the data sets for our analysis. The first and surprising discovery was to find just how many recordable events actually happened. One reason for this is that customers may make multiple visits to a website before purchasing or open an email multiple times. The following table shows the number of recorded events that preceded each order in a 90-day time window:

The analysis is ongoing, and we are aiming to publish a white paper on it in August, but there are three important initial findings that we can share:
– different channels should carry different overall weights, and we can analyse what they should be
– that each channel has its own time decay curve. In other words, the impact of events in one channel will wear off more quickly than for another channel.
– that the set of weightings used for new recruits should be different to those used for existing customers

The final results will include quantification of these findings.

If you would like us to share the white paper with you when it is ready please email us. It will be free for our newsletter recipients who order it in advance, but will be sold to others.

And if you would like meanwhile to have a chat to us about how to solve your own marketing mix attribution problem, we would be delighted to discuss, so please get in touch.

 


UniFida logo

UniFida is the trading name of Marketing Planning Services Ltd, a London based technology and data science company set up in 2014. Our overall aim is to help organisations build more customer value at less marketing cost.

Our technology focus has been to develop UniFida. Our data science business comes both from existing users of UniFida, and from clients looking to us to solve their more complex data related marketing questions.

Marketing is changing at an explosive speed, and our ambition is to help our clients stay empowered and ahead in this challenging environment.